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Tai Chi Qigong for Hypertention - High Blood Pressure

 

Tai Chi can improve the blood pressure of patients with hypertension by decreasing the serum Ang II level and increasing the serum NO level. This is  welcome research on the mechanism of action of how tai chi qigong benefits high blood pressure.

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Qigong for cognitive function

Qigong on cognitive function


This meta-analysis reviewed 24 high-quality studies that investigated the effects of Tai Chi & Qigong exercises on blood pressure, quality of life, and weight.  The overall conclusion was that Tai Chi & Qigong (called Baduanjin in the article, but including a large variety of Tai Chi and Qigong activities) had a significant impact on lowering blood pressure and improving quality of life, but that it did not impact weight (body mass index). 

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Tai chi qigong in Older Adults

Key Points

• Tai Chi was associated with lower incidence of frailty and impaired quality of life.

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Sitting Qigong for Impaired Mobility

Sitting Qigong for Impaired Mobility

 Sitting Tai Chi was found to have favourable effects on depressive symptoms, heart rate, and social domain of quality of life of individuals with impaired physical mobility. More research is needed on dynamic sitting balance, handgrip strength, and the physical and psychological domains of quality of life.

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Tai Chi Qigong for Adolescents

The Effects of Tai Chi and Qigong Exercise on Psychological Status in Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis


This systematic review and meta-analysis examined 4 Randomized Controlled Trials and 6 non-randomized comparison studies, involving 1,244 adolescents and the effects of Tai Chi and Qigong on psychological status. Results showed that tai chi and qigong provided beneficial effects for anxiety, depression, and reducing cortisol levels in adolescents. Although non-significant, results also showed trends towards improving mood, stress, and self esteem in participants who performed tai chi and qigong. These results were present after both short-term and long- term interventions. The authors concluded that although promising, the outcomes should be interpreted cautiously due to the limited number of studies and methodological weaknesses.

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Qigong and greater resilience during the time of COVID-19 in older adults

Qigong and greater resilience during the time of COVID-19 in older adults


Summary

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Qigong for MI - Heart Attack

Intervention Treatment for Myocardial Infarction With Tai Chi: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis


In this study, tai chi as compared with no exercise or low intensity exercise was more effective for endurance of the subjects, as evidenced in score on the 6 minute walk test.  The six minute walk test measures the distance a subject can walk during a time period of 6 minutes.  The endurance, balance and strength are all measures that would improve a person’s ability to walk a further distance during the time frame tested.


Tai chi did not affect the ability to perform activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing, etc.  It is possible that the subjects were already performing these activities well, since the ability to walk 6 minutes would indicate that the subject could already move about fairly well.


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Qigong in Post-menopausal Women

Qigong for Muscle Strength and Static Postural Control in Middle-Aged and Older Postmenopausal Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial 



Summary:

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Qigong for Depression

Qigong for Depression

 

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Pilot Study of Tai Chi in Improving Mood for those with depression.

This study was designed to assess the benefit of a 10 week Tai Chi program for remediation of major depressive disorders as measured by subjective reports and brain imaging studies.

The study involved 10 subjects, all born in China but currently living in the Boston area.  The Tai Chi program consisted of two 1 hour sessions per week for a period of 10 weeks, with instruction in the first 24 movements of Yang form.  The classes were taught by a Tai Chi master, and only Chinese was spoken for the classes. Each subject also had a DVD for home practice, and was encouraged to practice 3 times per week.

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Qigong improves quality of life for cardiovascular patients

Tai Chi/Qigong improves quality of life in cardiovascular disease patients


This systematic review screened almost 2000 articles and looked closely at 37 of them.  While the methodology was not rated very high, the overall result was very positive.  The investigators concluded that Tai Chi is potentially effective in improving anxiety, depression, and quality of life, and seems to be safe to practice in people with CVD and/or cardiovascular risk factors.

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Qigong for Parkinson’s Disease

Qigong for Parkinson’s Disease


Two studies have been done recently about the effects of Qigong/Tai Chi practice on Parkinson’s Patients.: “Impact of Tai Chi on motor and non-motor function meta-analysis” and “The Impact of Tai Chi and qigong mind-body exercises on motor and non-motor function and quality of life in Parkinson’s Patients.” Both were meta-analyses. Both referenced seven electronic databases. The first involved 325 patients; the second 735 patients. Both studies concluded that there is clear evidence that Qigong/Tai Chi can improve motor function, balance, walking ability and the ability to avoid falls. The first described the effect as “significant improvement.” The second also concluded that Qigong and Tai Chi can offset the effects of depression and can enhance the quality of life for Parkinson’s patients. Clearly, additional larger-scale studies are appropriate. 

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Qigong in Cancer Care - Updated Systemic Review and Meta-analysis

This timely article reviews twelve recent studies on Tai Chi and Qigong and its impact on cancer survivors. Using the Cochrane Collaboration Review Manager, a total of 915 subjects from 12 studies conducted since 2014 studying Qigong and Tai Chi treatments were reviewed. As before, the evidence is very supportive.  The studies all had controls, and compared usual care, support groups, waitlist control or sham Qigong control. The Qigong/Tai Chi interventions had positive effects on reducing the clinical symptoms of fatigue, sleep difficulties, anxiety, stress, and depressive symptoms, and improved overall quality of life. The only editorial comment is to watch for the sudden reversal in the graphs for which side showed the impact. For the first two graphs, the control results appeared on the left and the Qigong/Tai Chi results showed on the right.  For the remaining graphs, the Qigong/Tai Chi results showed on the left, and the control results appeared on the right. 

Written by CJ Rhoads, December 26, 2020.  

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Qigong for Diabetes

Three studies on Diabetes

 These three studies all report positive effects of either tai chi or qigong or both as a treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus.  The first two studies were meta-analysis, with a combined total of 42 studies.  The third was a primary study with 103 subjects.  All reported beneficial results for the subjects compared to controls. Compared to aerobic exercise, the the first meta analysis indicated that tai chi had benefits over and above aerobic exercise for lowering A1C (average long term blood sugar levels) and raising hdl ( the “good” cholesterol).  The third individual study indicated that fasting blood sugar levels were improved more with qigong than tai chi, especially if the patient had had diabetes for a longer period of time.

 In all, the mounting research shows that both tai chi and qigong are effective treatments for type 2 diabetes. 

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Physical Benefits of Qigong as exercise

Effect on Strength and Endurance

Effect of Tai Chi on muscle strength, physical endurance, postural balance and flexibility: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 

Wehner C, Blank C, Arvandi M, Wehner C, Schobersberger W. Effect of Tai Chi on muscle strength, physical endurance, postural balance and flexibility: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ Open Sport Exerc Med. 2021;7(1):e000817.

This paper conducted a systematic review of 31 papers, including 21 in a meta-analysis, looking at the effect of Tai Chi on muscle strength, physical endurance, postural balance and flexibility as measured by tests commonly used in health-related fitness or competitive sports contexts.The number of participants in each study ranged from 14 - 368, and a vast majority of the participants were over the age of 60. Intervention periods ranged from 3 weeks to 12 months. Most of the studies were based on Yang style forms whereas three studies included Chen, Sun, and Wu styles.

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Qigong for sleep

 Qigong for Sleep

This meta-analysis considered 444 studies initially, from both English and Chinese databases.
Eventually 24 studies, published from 2014-2018, qualified for the study. 1858 adults
participated in 8-26 week trial periods. Sleep is being recognized as crucial to our health and
well-being. The article argued that poor sleep is “a universal issue in modern society, causing
insidious physical and psychological disorders.” At least 25% of adults report sleep complaints.
The social cost is found in work-absenteeism and reduced productivity. This meta-analysis found
that Tai Chi Chuan can be effective in treating sleep disorder. As the report stated: “Tai Chi
Chuan elicited moderate improvements in subjective sleep quality.” The effect was found to be
greater with Asian populations than western populations. The optimal time of Tai Chi Chuan
practice to be most effective was 60-90 minutes per session. While the results were encouraging,
more thorough studies must be conducted in order to optimize Tai Chi Chuan practices amidst
varying populations.










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Online Qigong for People with Cystic Fibrosis

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many people were forced to change the way they do things, including health and wellness programs and exercising . Gyms and exercise centers were mostly closed. If places were open, people opted to stay home for safety and to protect their health. This includes people with general overhead good health and those with health conditions.

This study looked at the feasibility of offering virtual Ta Chi programs for individuals with Cystic Fibrosis. Forty participants were randomized into 2 groups- group A meeting face-to-face with a private instructor, and Group B with private lessons using a virtual set up. For each group, eight lessons were delivered over a period of three months, timetabled depending on the patient's current health status. Age groups for the study were as follows: 6–11, 12–16, >16 years. Movements were adapted from the “Eternal Spring” therapeutic Tai Chi and Qigong method, which uses animal movements and can be practiced standing or seated. A DVD and printed exercise workbook were provided for additional practice. According to the authors, this study has shown online TC is possible for people with CF and qualitative outcomes are comparable to in-person, face to face tuition. For the participants in this study, internet tuition seemed to be convenient, enabled normal family life to continue, and could engage patients who were geographically isolated or unable to join a local group.

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Effects of Tai chi qigong on cognitive function in older adults


“Meta-Analytic Review of the effects of TaiChiChuan on Cognitive Function in Older Adults with Cognitive Impairment”

Hindawi Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Volume 2020


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Qigong for High Blood Pressure - Hypertension

This article is the first meta-analysis of available literature on the effect of TaiChi/Qigong exercise [TCQE] on Essential Hypertension [EH] patients. The focus was on the effect of TCQE on blood pressure and blood levels of Nitric Oxide and Endothelin-1 in EH patients. Nine randomized controlled trials were cited involving 516 EH patients, with an intervention duration lasting from 1.5 to 6 months. The conclusions are very positive, showing that TCQE can be an effective treatment of EH. 


Summary by Dr. Charles Garrettson, George Mason University

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Qigong for Stroke prevention and treatment

Two research studies on stroke - one for prevention and one for Quality of Life post stroke


Article 1- Stroke Prevention

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